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Positive Youth Development (PYD) Measurement Toolkit

By | June 7th, 2019|

PYD-Measurement-Toolkit-Final

Purpose of this Toolkit

The Positive Youth Development Measurement Toolkit, developed by YouthPower Learning, provides guidance and resources for implementers of youth programming in LMICs to integrate PYD principles in their monitoring and evaluation (M&E) systems and effectively measure PYD outputs and outcomes within their programs. This online toolkit provides an introduction and a brief overview of the toolkit.

The overall goal of this toolkit is to help programs effectively measure PYD outcomes in order to improve program performance over time, contribute to the body of evidence on PYD, and ultimately influence multi-sector outcomes and impact of youth programming.

This PYD measurement toolkit provides the following:
1. A framework for measuring PYD;
2. A set of illustrative PYD indicators that can be applied to and across various sectors;
3. A discussion about the application of PYD framework and indicators at each phase of a program design and evaluation; 
4. A discussion about the major considerations for adapting measures cross-culturally
5. Resources and references for implementers and evaluators;

Furthermore, the toolkit provides FAQs and a PYD glossary. YouthPower Learning conducted a one-day PYD Measurement training based on the toolkit.  Slides and other resources are available for users.

The toolkit can also help program implementers, evaluators and researchers contribute to building the evidence within and across sectors on two overarching research questions:
• What is the effectiveness of PYD programs in improving outcomes for youth in LMICs?
• What are the key PYD features associated with improved outcomes for youth?

Intended Audiences
The primary audiences of this toolkit are
• implementers,
• evaluators and
• funders of youth programs (both United States Government (USG) and non-USG).

Other audiences include those in the broader PYD space such as academics or youth advocates interested in PYD measurement.

Training matters: A framework for core competencies of sexuality educators

By | March 22nd, 2018|

BZgA_Training_matters_EN

This framework focuses on sexuality educators and the competencies they should have, or develop, in order to conduct sexuality education. Educators’
competencies in the areas of attitudes, skills and knowledge are taken into account and described in detail in Part 2 of this document.
The WHO Regional Office for Europe and the German Federal Centre for Health Education (BZgA), a WHO collaborating centre for sexual and reproductive health, are committed to improving access to, and quality of, sexuality  Throughout this document, the term “sexuality educator” is used instead of “sexuality teacher”.  In this area, BZgA and the Regional Office work closely with the European Expert Group on Sexuality Education.

The guideline includes good practices of the training of sexuality educators from the WHO European Region:
Belgium
Bosnia and Herzegovina
Bulgaria
Estonia
Finland
Switzerland
Ukraine

 

https://www.bzga-whocc.de/fileadmin/user_upload/BZgA_Training_matters_EN.pdf

Booklet: Rural Innovators

By | March 14th, 2018|

 

 

BOOKLET_Rural-Innovators

The content of this booklet is:
Profiling your organisation;
Developing the organisation;
The role of the rural youth worker;
Basics of project management;
Follow-up, dissemination and exploitation od results;
Participate in someone else’s project first;
Money for international rural youth projects;
Money for international (rural) youth projects;
Involve rural young people;
Make young people proud of their rural heritage.

 

The tool was published to the Toolbox by

Solidariedarte Associação de Educação e Integração pela Arte e Desenvolvimento Cultural, Social e Local (on 13 March 2018)

 

https://www.salto-youth.net/tools/toolbox/tool/rural-innovators-booklet.2261/

ONLINE COURSE: Role of Young People in Peacebuilding, Conflict Resolution and Violent Extremism Prevention

By | April 5th, 2018|

The International Institute for Youth Development PETRI – Sofia just launched the online course on the role of young people in peacebuilding, conflict resolution, and violent extremism prevention. The project is supported by UNFPA EECARO.
The online course aims to provide knowledge and skills for young people on peace, conflict and violence, the YPS agenda, the roots of violent extremism and the basics of communication skills. The information is presented in short videos.
The topics are following:
1. Introduction to peace and conflict studies
2. Violence and nature of violence
3. Trends and causes of armed conflicts
4. Peace, pacifism, and non-violence
5. SDG 16 and resolution 2250
6. Culture, power, and gender
7. Negotiations
8. Mediation in theory
9. Violent extremism
10. Communication skills

See the online course to the following link: http://petri-sofia.org/en/online-course/

Gender and Development

By | September 29th, 2017|

Explore the relationship between gender and international development

What does gender have to do with international development? Is ‘woman’ the centre point of gender and development? What is it that brings gender and development together?

These are some of the questions you will be asking and answering on this course. You’ll explore the gendered dimensions of contemporary international and community development and ultimately learn how and why gender is so important.

Gender and Development

 

“I just want basic things! – We are not there yet”: Understanding the needs, services and challenges of LGBT community members and NGOs in Sofia, Bulgaria [Research report]

By | July 29th, 2019|

I-JUST-WANT-BASIC-THINGS-WE-ARE-NOT-THERE-YET_LGBT-needs-assessment

 

The European Voluntary Service (EVS) volunteers, Viktorija Bondikjova from North Macedonia (hosted by Y-PEER PETRI – Sofia) and Carmen Rivas from Spain (hosted by Smokinya Foundation) conducted a qualitative community-based research as part of their personal project within the EVS program in their hosting organizations. This research report is part of the local needs assessment which aimed to understand the needs, services and challenges of LGBT community members and NGOs in Sofia, Bulgaria. The final event for promotion of the findings was held on July 18th in Dada Cultural Bar and it was attended by around 40 people.

 

Why did we decide to conduct this LGBT needs assessment? 

Due to the lack of research background on LGBT needs and rights in Bulgaria, as well as insufficient funding to implement research projects on this matter, we conducted this local needs assessment to provide critical information about LGBT community needs as identified by them and by the NGOs working with them. The aim of this project is the increase the knowledge and raise the awareness of the critical issues which affect the LGBT community, and contribute to more mobilized and organized LGBT community. The goal of this needs assessment project is to offer possible ideas on how to improve the situation of the LGBT community in Bulgaria in different areas of life, such as law, health, education, media and community organizing, and explore ways to address LGBT peoples’ and NGOs needs.

We are tremendously grateful to Y-PEER PETRI – Sofia and Smokinya Foundation for supporting the research report and to the Rainbow Hub for their collaboration during the entire research process.

 

The PDF version of the report is attached below.

 

If you have any questions, you can always contact the authors:

Viktorija Bondikjova at viktorijabon@gmail.com

Carmen Rivas at carmenjoserivas@gmail.com

 

We hope you enjoy reading the content! 🙂

Research report – Young People Advancing Sexual and Reproductive Health: Toward a New Normal

By | June 10th, 2019|

Yield_full-report_June-2019_final

Young People Advancing Sexual and Reproductive Health: Toward a New Normal is a research report documenting the multiple benefits of meaningful youth participation and leadership in sexual health and rights (SRHR) programs. It synthesizes global evidence from the field on how to foster authentic youth engagement, the impacts that result, and recommendations that can strengthen and scale this stream of programming investment.

The report is a product of the YIELD Project, which is guided by a Steering Committee comprised of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the David and Lucile Packard Foundation, The Summit Foundation, and the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation.

For more information, please contact: info@yieldproject.org.

 

You can read more here: https://www.youthlead.org/resources/young-people-advancing-sexual-and-reproductive-health-toward-new-normal

Positive Youth Development (PYD) Measurement Toolkit

By | June 7th, 2019|

PYD-Measurement-Toolkit-Final

Purpose of this Toolkit

The Positive Youth Development Measurement Toolkit, developed by YouthPower Learning, provides guidance and resources for implementers of youth programming in LMICs to integrate PYD principles in their monitoring and evaluation (M&E) systems and effectively measure PYD outputs and outcomes within their programs. This online toolkit provides an introduction and a brief overview of the toolkit.

The overall goal of this toolkit is to help programs effectively measure PYD outcomes in order to improve program performance over time, contribute to the body of evidence on PYD, and ultimately influence multi-sector outcomes and impact of youth programming.

This PYD measurement toolkit provides the following:
1. A framework for measuring PYD;
2. A set of illustrative PYD indicators that can be applied to and across various sectors;
3. A discussion about the application of PYD framework and indicators at each phase of a program design and evaluation; 
4. A discussion about the major considerations for adapting measures cross-culturally
5. Resources and references for implementers and evaluators;

Furthermore, the toolkit provides FAQs and a PYD glossary. YouthPower Learning conducted a one-day PYD Measurement training based on the toolkit.  Slides and other resources are available for users.

The toolkit can also help program implementers, evaluators and researchers contribute to building the evidence within and across sectors on two overarching research questions:
• What is the effectiveness of PYD programs in improving outcomes for youth in LMICs?
• What are the key PYD features associated with improved outcomes for youth?

Intended Audiences
The primary audiences of this toolkit are
• implementers,
• evaluators and
• funders of youth programs (both United States Government (USG) and non-USG).

Other audiences include those in the broader PYD space such as academics or youth advocates interested in PYD measurement.

“I just want basic things! – We are not there yet”: Understanding the needs, services and challenges of LGBT community members and NGOs in Sofia, Bulgaria [Research report]

By | July 29th, 2019|

I-JUST-WANT-BASIC-THINGS-WE-ARE-NOT-THERE-YET_LGBT-needs-assessment

 

The European Voluntary Service (EVS) volunteers, Viktorija Bondikjova from North Macedonia (hosted by Y-PEER PETRI – Sofia) and Carmen Rivas from Spain (hosted by Smokinya Foundation) conducted a qualitative community-based research as part of their personal project within the EVS program in their hosting organizations. This research report is part of the local needs assessment which aimed to understand the needs, services and challenges of LGBT community members and NGOs in Sofia, Bulgaria. The final event for promotion of the findings was held on July 18th in Dada Cultural Bar and it was attended by around 40 people.

 

Why did we decide to conduct this LGBT needs assessment? 

Due to the lack of research background on LGBT needs and rights in Bulgaria, as well as insufficient funding to implement research projects on this matter, we conducted this local needs assessment to provide critical information about LGBT community needs as identified by them and by the NGOs working with them. The aim of this project is the increase the knowledge and raise the awareness of the critical issues which affect the LGBT community, and contribute to more mobilized and organized LGBT community. The goal of this needs assessment project is to offer possible ideas on how to improve the situation of the LGBT community in Bulgaria in different areas of life, such as law, health, education, media and community organizing, and explore ways to address LGBT peoples’ and NGOs needs.

We are tremendously grateful to Y-PEER PETRI – Sofia and Smokinya Foundation for supporting the research report and to the Rainbow Hub for their collaboration during the entire research process.

 

The PDF version of the report is attached below.

 

If you have any questions, you can always contact the authors:

Viktorija Bondikjova at viktorijabon@gmail.com

Carmen Rivas at carmenjoserivas@gmail.com

 

We hope you enjoy reading the content! 🙂

Well-being and safety of women, North Macedonia – OSCE-led study on violence against women

By | May 16th, 2019|

Safety-and-wellbeing-of-women-in-N.Macedonia_OSCE-research

The OSCE has strong commitments on combating violence against women and girls (VAWG). On 6th of March 2019, the main results report of the OSCE-led Survey on the Well-being and Safety of Women was launched. This is the first comparable representative study conducted in South-East Europe and Eastern Europe. The OSCE Gender Section is organizing a high-level conference on 6-7 May 2019 to disseminate the main results of the survey and discuss next steps with key stakeholders.

The OSCE-led survey therefore provides a wealth of information, including data on social norms and attitudes, prevalence rates of violence against women, its consequences as well as reporting and help-seeking by survivors. The research shows that gaps in the ability of local institutions’ to understand and address women’s and girls’ experience of personal insecurity and violence continue to exist. The survey data suggests that beliefs in female subservience, spousal obedience and silence surrounding VAWG continue to persist in the region and that those women who hold such beliefs are more likely to say they have experienced violence.

This report presents the findings from the OSCE’s qualitative and quantitative study in North Macedonia. The study was implemented in spring/summer 2018 and involved:

• 15 key expert interviews, which provided an overview of issues related
to VAW and of conflict-related acts of violence;
• A survey on experiences of violence among a representative sample
of 1,910 women aged 18–74, including 496 women who completed
the survey in Albanian; the survey used a multistage, stratified, random
probability sample design;
• Eight focus groups with women from various demographic backgrounds (two
with Albanian and two with Roma women) on their attitudes towards the
subject;
• Four in-depth interviews with women who had experienced violence in order
to understand, in more detail, the impact the violence had on
them (including one Albanian and one Roma woman).

Policy Briefs 3 and 4 on Sexuality Education by BZgA and UNFPA

By | January 29th, 2018|

PB-3-4-on-Sexuality-Education

The Federal Centre for Health Education (BZgA) in Germany and the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA), Regional Office for Eastern Europe and Central Asia jointly developed a series of policy briefs on sexuality education.

The first two issues published in 2015 (also in cooperation with the WHO Regional Office for Europe) have now
been complemented by Policy Brief n° 3 and 4: Policy Brief No. 3 ‘Introducing Sexuality Education: Key Steps for Advocates in Europe and Central Asia’
provides an overview of the most important steps for the introduction (or revision) of national in-school sexuality-education programmes and reviews of existing resources.

Both policy briefs are also available from following website:
https://www.bzga-whocc.de/en/publications/policy-briefs-on-sexuality-education-new/

Threats on Women’s Rights in Europe – the case of abortion

By | December 9th, 2017|

Assaults on women’s reproductive health & rights take many forms in Europe today. Barriers to safe abortion care are among the most problematic.

Sexual and reproductive rights are human rights. Governments have very clear obligation under international human right law to respect these rights. However, women in Europe still have these rights denied or restricted as a result of laws, policies and practices that ultimately reflect continuing gender stereotypes and inequalities.

Women’s sexual and reproductive health and rights cover:

– comprehensive sexuality education

– affordable and accessible contraception

– safe abortion

– quality maternal health care

There has been immense progress across the world and in Europe. However at the same time, perhaps because of that progress, we have begun to see backlash. Even where the law allows abortion, women face multiple obstacles to access it, including:

– Financial, social and practical barriers

– Denial of care and services

– Third-party authorisation, mandatory counseling and waiting periods

In December 2017, the Commissioner for Human Rights of the Council of Europe addressed a set of recommendations to European States to ensure all women’s sexual and reproductive rights. They focused in particular on women’s rights to life, freedom from torture and ill-treatment, health, privacy and equality.

Freedom – International Day of the Girl

By | October 11th, 2017|

Every day girls around the world are fighting for their freedom. This International Day of the Girl – join them and raise your voice:

1. Share the film and tell us what #FreedomForGirls means to you

2. Take action at http://www.globalgoals.org/dayofthegirl

In 2015 when leaders signed up to the UN Sustainable Development Goals – the Global Goals – they made a promise – to empower all girls. There has been progress but we need to keep up the pressure. If we work together we can make sure world leaders deliver and every girl grows up healthy, safe, empowered and able to fulfil her dreams.

Preventing cervical cancer in Georgia

By | September 29th, 2017|

With UNFPA support, Georgia is piloting an organised cervical cancer screening programme, one of the first such programmes in Eastern Europe and Central Asia. It is designed to reduce cervical cancer in Georgia, a disease that leads to 18,000 deaths in Eastern Europe and Central Asia every year, although it is almost entirely preventable.